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The Boise, Twin Falls, Jerome, Magic Valley | Inland Empire and Los Angeles IT Experts


We work hard behind the scenes so annoying technology issues don't slow your business down.

Our mission is to help businesses like yours increase productivity and get more out of the technology you invest in.
We specialize in solutions that safeguard and protect your data and keep operations running smoothly.

Managed IT Services

Intelligent remote monitoring, proactive maintenance, and behind-the-scenes remote support.

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Network Security

Protect your business from threats like malware, viruses, phishing attacks, hackers and other threads.

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Backup & Disaster Recovery

Ensure peace-of-mind in any situation with the most complete data backup solution available.

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Cloud Hosting Solutions

Reduce infrastructure costs, collaborate, and get more done with our unique cloud solutions.

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When you just want IT to work!

There are a lot of computer shops out there that you can call up to fix an issue or install a piece of equipment. They might be able to get you out of crisis mode, but they aren’t looking at the full picture.

At Marin Technologies, we understand business. We consult. We provide solutions to solve everyday challenges. We just happen to fix computers as well.

We believe (and have proven) that if you proactively manage technology, run maintenance religiously, and monitor a business network, everyday issues and downtime will be greatly reduced.

This is what makes us different than your typical tech support company. Sure, we can fix computer issues when you have them, but our specialty is preventing them in the first place.

Are you looking for a partner you can trust your IT with? Sign up for a FREE IT Assessment to get started today.

Managed IT Questions?

If you have questions about whether or not our IT services platform is right for your business, simply complete and submit this form and one of our trusted IT professionals will promptly respond to your query!

What Our Clients Say

  • I don’t know if I can say enough about Marin Technologies.
    President, Concordia Finance, Inc. / Rancho Cucamonga

    I don’t know if I can say enough about Marin Technologies. I have known Steve Marin for 8 years. He was working for another company at the time but still made us feel like his only client. He even recommended a person to be our in house I.T. manager. The relationship continued as an additional source for our I.T. issues. When our I.T. manager left the company, Marin Technologies had been established. It was an easy decision to make the transition.

  • Marin Technologies treats me like I am their only and most special client.
    President, Accredited Tax, Inc. / Chino, CA

    The uniqueness I have experienced is one of being treated like I am their only and most special client. The response time and willingness to help and wide range of knowledge of technology is beyond my expectations of any firm.

  • Marin Tech provides excellent service with personal attention
    Engineering Manager, Yardney Water Filtration Systems, Inc. / Riverside, CA

    Marin Tech provides excellent service with personal attention, we always get the expert tech!

Latest Blogs

Is It Fair to Be Fired for Falling for a Phishing… Test?

Now, what if the whole situation was actually just a test, with you pulling the strings? Do you fire them then?

If the concept of terminating someone for falling for a simulated phishing attempt doesn’t sit with you quite right, you're not alone. Many cybersecurity and phishing experts feel the same way.

What Is the Purpose of a Phishing Test?

Let’s consider why you would want to run a phish test in the first place.

Naturally, you want your business to be as secure as possible -- that only makes sense, especially given how prevalent threats are nowadays. Between January 1, 2005 and April 18, 2018, there were 8,854 reported breaches. This averages out to almost two every day - and again, these are just the breaches that were reported. Who knows how many companies managed to sweep their security failings under the rug, or simply shut their doors without explanation?

Your security only becomes more crucial when you consider how effective a tool phishing has proven to be for cybercriminals, and how prevalent these attacks are. While only 1.2 percent of all global email is seen as suspicious, that’s still a worldwide total of at least 3.4 billion phishing messages sent every day.

Furthermore, except in the case of spear phishing, phishing attempts take relatively little effort for a cybercriminal to put together (part of the reason that they are so common). Spear phishing is arguably more dangerous, as these targeted attacks require the cybercriminal to do some research and customize their attack to their target, which makes their attempt much more convincing.

So, with phishing attacks becoming so common, it is extremely important that your staff is able to identify them. Hence phishing tests, which allow you to evaluate your staff’s present abilities in a simulated scenario. Take note: phishing tests are designed to evaluate abilities, not competencies, which is an important distinction to observe while examining the prospect of firing employees who fail phishing tests.

What Some Companies Do (And What Security Experts Think)

Some companies out there demonstrate a very low tolerance for failed phishing tests. This is especially true in the financial industry, but that is the outlier among all industries, and for reasons that are pretty understandable. However, there are those companies that will terminate employees who fail too many (however many that may be) of these evaluations. Others will launch these attacks for the sake of keeping their employees on their toes.

Unfortunately for these companies, what they fail to realize is that these kinds of behaviors will do nothing to improve their security. Sure, firing someone who has a hard time recognizing a phishing email means that individual won’t subject your company to that particular threat, but who’s to say that the next person hired will be able to recognize them any more consistently? Can the rest of your staff actually absorb that employee’s responsibilities? Not to mention, just firing someone will do nothing to actually educate them on phishing, which means that another business (that could very well have some of your information on file) might be the next to hire that employee, and could find themselves breached as a result.

You also need to consider the stress that this puts on your employees, demoralizing them and making them resentful toward you -- the employer who keeps trying to catch them in a mistake without any constructive follow-up provided. 

Finally, think about how the threat of consequences might influence an employee’s decisions. Many solutions offer the option to report suspected phishing, and many employees (even if they’ve already clicked on the link) will still report them. At least, that’s what should happen… but if there are consequences that may come back to them for their mistake, they lose the motivation to report it. Why would they open themselves up to suspicion when their job could be on the line?

In short, your employees won’t trust you enough to tell you the truth.

How to Approach Phishing Tests Instead

Surprising your staff with an unannounced phishing test is an okay thing to do, as long as it is accompanied by a review of the results and follow-up training to help them improve, rather than a pink slip.

There’s also a lot to be said about leveraging positive reinforcement after a phishing test, rather than focusing on the negative. Rewarding the department that performs the best with a small bonus or gift cards will motivate everyone to be more vigilant, as there is a potential reward at stake for doing well. However, if you really want to hammer home the real-world consequences of phishing, gamification can be an effective way to do so while still motivating your employees. Rather than the carrot of a gift card, you could give the lowest-scoring team some kind of stick--like the responsibility of buying lunch for the rest of the team one day. While this will still sting, it is less extreme than termination and better communicates the actual consequences of phishing.

If you need help running a phishing test, reach out to Marin Technologies. We can help advise you and your team on how to avoid phishing scams and other security risks by identifying them before it is too late. Give us a call at (208) 329-6792 to learn more.

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Tip of the Week: Speed Up Your Computing with Windows Shortcuts

In the interest of helping you save some time, we’ve assembled some shortcuts to help speed up some of the tasks that take a little longer.

Rotate Screen

Okay, this one isn’t so much a task as it is a way to keep office pranksters from wasting too much of your staff’s valuable time. An easy prank to play on someone who left their workstation unlocked is to rotate their screen with a quick shortcut. In order to level the playing field, this can be undone with the same shortcut: Ctrl + Alt + Arrow Key

Use this shortcut responsibly!

Switch Between Open Windows

Sometimes, you find yourself losing the window you need behind all the others you’ve opened up. While you could hover over the corresponding application in the taskbar to find it, it is probably faster to use the Alt + Tab shortcut to cycle through a layover window that displays all of your open windows to select the appropriate one. This can also be a handy way to see what windows you still have open, letting you determine which ones can be closed.

Snap Windows

Windows allows users to leverage a split-screen functionality by snapping application windows to the edges of the screen, dividing it equally between them. While you could finagle with clicking and dragging the windows to the sides until they reshape the way you want, it is much easier to simply press Windows Key + Left/Right Arrow Key to accomplish the same thing. If you want to snap your Window to a specific corner, dividing your screen into quarters, press the Up/Down Arrow Key immediately after the Left/Right Arrow Key.

Once you’re ready to maximize a window again, Windows Key + Up Arrow Key will allow you to do so.

Quick Shut Down

Clicking through menus can be a pain - especially when you’re just trying to shut down, or log out, or something simple like that. Thanks to this Windows shortcut and the Quick Access Menu, however, there’s a much more convenient way.

By pressing the Windows Key + X and combining it with the following keys, you can accomplish quite a few very common processes:

U - Shut Down
I - Sign Out
R - Restart
H - Hibernate
S - Sleep

Create Your Own Desktop Keyboard Shortcut

Finally, if you have a particular folder or application you frequently utilize and you keep on your desktop, you can create a keyboard shortcut that allows you to access it quickly. Right click the icon on your desktop and select Properties. You should see an empty field labeled Shortcut key. Simply click to select the field and press your desired shortcut key. This will create your new shortcut: Ctrl + Alt + [whatever key you chose].

What other shortcuts do you frequently use? Share them in the comments, and subscribe to our blog for more tips, tricks, and technology best practices!

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Your Guide to the Malware You Could Encounter

Print out this guide and hand it out so your team always has a handy reference to turn to.

Viruses

A computer virus is perhaps the most recognized term for malware, in that many users will attribute any stunted functionality to one. In actuality, a computer virus is a malicious piece of code that can replicate and disperse without the person responsible for unleashing it remaining involved. This makes them a particularly effective weapon for hackers to use against targets of all sizes, often by attaching it to some file or application that their intended victim is likely to download. 

Worms

Worms are another self-replicating pest, predating even viruses. Once a system has been infected (either via an application flaw or a hacker’s social engineering) a worm can truly wreak havoc. Additional malware can be transferred into the system, system memory can be used up to create issues, and communications can be cut back. Email is another effective way that worms have been used against businesses. All it takes for an entire company to be infected is for one employee to open the wrong email attachment.

Spyware

This variety of malware is useful to a cybercriminal who intends to create even more considerable problems sometime later. This is because it can be used to bypass a system’s security by monitoring a user’s actions, recording credentials and snooping on their behaviors. Keyloggers are a well-known variety of spyware, as they secretly record a user’s keystrokes to steal credentials and other sensitive data. As an added impact, spyware also eats up a system’s CPU resources to increase its vulnerability to further attack.

Adware

Adware is intended to fool a user into clicking through a forged advertisement to what appears to be the website described in the ad, but is actually the creation of a cybercriminal. 

Malvertising

Some cybercriminals prefer to camouflage their attacks behind legitimate advertising networks. By paying for ad space and hiding code within the ad, the user could again be brought to a malicious site. Alternatively, the ad may instead install malware onto the user’s system - sometimes without any action needed from the user at all. This includes scripts used to turn a system into a cryptomining puppet for the cybercriminal’s benefit, as well as Trojans and ransomware.

Trojan Horse

Just like the wooden horse strategically used in the Trojan War, Trojans hide their malware attacks in what appear to be legitimate programs. They are particularly common for a few reasons: first, they are relatively easy for even a novice hacker to create, and second, they are very effectively spread through social engineering and deception. Once the user activates the program, the payload is delivered and the Trojan fulfills its goal, whether that’s damaging or stealing data or simply throwing the proverbial wrench into the computer’s operations. 

Ransomware

Ransomware has seen a considerable jump in popularity over the last few years, which makes a lot of sense in a few ways. Not only has it proven to be an effective means of attack, as businesses, healthcare organizations, and even entire cities have been brought to a halt by it, it can be very lucrative for the cybercriminal responsible. Once the ransomware has been executed, it encrypts the infected system and locks the user out. The user is then given a message explaining what happened, with a link to an encrypted cryptocurrency wallet to pay the ransom in exchange for the decryption key. Unfortunately, many victims are never given the key, even if they pay.

Logic Bomb

A logic bomb can, appropriately enough, act as a digital land mine. Lying dormant in a system until it is triggered by some event, a logic bomb will damage a computer - sometimes causing physical damage to its components. For instance, some logic bombs overwork certain pieces of hardware, like hard drives and cooling fans, until these devices fail.

Backdoor

A backdoor is less of an attack itself, and more of an attack vector. It effectively gives a cybercriminal a means of getting into a vulnerable system again later, even if the original vulnerability is resolved. Using this backdoor, the cybercriminal has the opportunity to return again later, when the user has again let their guard down.

Rootkit

A rootkit is what enables a hacker to create a backdoor. By modifying system files by virtue of software vulnerabilities, a hacker is able to leave themselves an opening into their targeted system.

Botnets

Botnets are made up of bots, or infected programs and systems, that can execute whatever task the cybercriminal wishes in tandem with one another. Essentially, a botnet can consist of hundreds of thousands of devices, such as computers, smartphones, and even IoT devices. With their collected computing power, botnets are formidable threats, which is why they are commonly used to execute Distributed Denial of Service attacks.

Fileless Malware

A more recent development, fileless malware infects a computer and starts to pull the strings from inside the device’s random-access memory, or RAM. Once there, this malware is able to spread using encryption keys and APIs, as well as cause problems by altering user privileges and misusing admin tools.

Being able to recognize threats is a crucial part of stopping them. The other part? Having the right security solutions in place before they strike. Marin Technologies can help on both fronts. Reach out to us at (208) 329-6792 to learn more and ensure your company is better defended.

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Latest Blog

Let’s run through a quick scenario: your company’s computing infrastructure is infected with ransomware. Fortunately, you have an offsite backup, so you are able to restore your systems without too much trouble, other than the time you’ve lost. As you investigate the root ca...

Latest News

Marin Technologies is proud to announce the launch of our new updated and imroved website at https://www.marintechit.com The goal of the new website is to make it easier for our existing clients to submit and manage support requests, and provide more information about our services for prospective clients.